Videography

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then what is the value of a video? With interviews, dialogue, and narration already built in, this form of producing a journalistic story dramatically increases its interest. Video stories allow journalists to visually set the scene of their subject through the use of B-roll footage, clips of what may be discussed in the interview or other details relevant to the account. Also, music or other images have the ability to evoke greater emotion than the journalist may have been able to conjure through another medium.

In my multimedia journalism lecture this past Monday, February 17, the topics discussed were editing still photographs to create more interest, and the emotion that can be procured through a well-edited video story. The example my professor showed the class chronicled the life of a young boy with a severe physical disability. Although confined to a wheelchair, the boy possessed a wildly optimistic outlook on life and never failed to entertain those around him.

New York Times video journalist Brent McDonald utilizes his equipment to capture the perfect angle for his story. McDonald's job title does not match its description as he is also a reporter, camera operator, sound technician, lighting technician, writer, narrator and editor. Photo taken from nytimes.com.

New York Times video journalist Brent McDonald utilizes his equipment to capture the perfect angle for his story. McDonald’s job title does not match its description as he is also a reporter, camera operator, sound technician, lighting technician, writer, narrator and editor. Photo taken from nytimes.com.

Obviously the emotion of the story could be easily conveyed through a video project, but the University of Missouri students who put it all together managed to intensify the effect with spectacular editing. In “Behind the Scenes: On the Road With a VJ,” New York Times video journalist Brent McDonald explains, “Much of the storytelling happens after the shoot, when you sketch the narrative arc, knowing now what material you have to work with. Generally speaking, stories that make for captivating [Web] video have a strong visual and emotional payoff.”

McDonald later discusses the extended amount of time video stories require, so it looks like I’m going to be using the remainder of my Keurig K-cups in the upcoming weeks.

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3 thoughts on “Videography

  1. Hey Linds,

    I like the Videography topic for your blog–

    well done.  It is really what Steve Doroba

    does, except not as journalistic and more in-studio.

    FYI, here is a link to what I’m trying to sell,

    http://www.onpremiselaw.com , which involves

    many of the same elements/roles (but uses

    several people instead of the Times reporter

    , who usually goes solo.

    Luv you,  Mom

  2. Lindsay,

    Good job this week. I like how you brought in another source of videography besides the one Steve showed you to include in your post.

    I would have liked more details about the video Steve showed, as well as how you think the students’ editing of the video made the boy’s story so impactful. Although planning for your projects is very important so you have a general idea what you want to cover in your interviews, it is impossible to figure out exactly what your project will become until you have completed your interviews and go back through your material. This is not only true for your upcoming video projects, but for your audio assignment and audio slideshow as well. Sometimes, what the subject says during interviews (or some of the photos or video footage that you manage to capture) can change the direction of your story for the better. It’s important to not get too tied down to one idea and instead, let your material guide you along to uncover the best possible story.

    I like the photo and link you included, and you did a good job with your photo caption as well!

  3. Hi Lindsay:

    Looks good! Here are a few suggestions. I do realize that the way you write, in some cases, is perfectly consistent with today’s journalists, but you must decide if that is the type of style you want, or if you are most interested in proper usage, or further, perhaps a cautious blend of these two styles.

    Try not to start sentences with “with,” “in,” or other prepositions.   Suggest changing “have the ability to evoke” to “can evoke.”   Active Voice Suggest changing “In my multimedia journalism lecture this past Monday, February 17, the topics discussed were editing still photographs to create more interest, and the emotion that can be procured through a well-edited video story“ to “We discussed editing still photographs to create more interest, and eliciting emotion via a well-edited video story,in my multimedia journalism lecture this past Monday, February 17.”   Suggest changing “Obviously the emotion of the story could be easily conveyed through a video project,…” to “Obviously, we could have easily conveyed the emotion of the story through a video project.” Love,

    U. Doug

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